The Julie Pogue Properties Louisville KY Real Estate Blog

Anchorage Neighborhood Showcase

ANCHORAGE KY HOMES FOR SALE

Anchorage is a historic, thriving community nestled into the outskirts of Louisville, Kentucky.  Originally (circa 1920's) the hot spot for weekend country homes to wealthy Louisville citizens, today the land is occupied by charming homes of all shapes and sizes.  Residents enjoy a close-knit village that remains committed to it's families, it's award-winning school, it's natural environment as well at the ongoing preservation of the city character.Village Anchor

A variety of local activities, including the annual 4th of July festical complete with a children's parade, encourage lively neighborhood involvement.  Stroll or take a job on the scenic Anchorage Trail and you are likely to run into neighbors on horseback.Anchorage KY

If you are looking for a small town feel in a truly picturesque setting, Anchorage is definitely a place to consider calling home.

 

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What's New in the New Home Market?

What’s New in the New-Home Market?

Boyce Thompson’s The New New Home aims to “demystify” the factors in play when it comes to building a new home in the current market, with special attention paid to environmental and economic factors that many buyers might want to consider when purchasing or building a new home.

Blueprint

Credit: Will Scullin

In general, The New New Home proves a useful guidebook for people looking to build the home of their dreams. Thompson offers tips on making homes more energy efficient with careful planning: “Basic decisions—like whether you want a one- or two-story house, whether the garage will be attached, the height of ceilings, or whether you use dark or light colors on exterior or interior surfaces—profoundly impact energy consumption,” he writes.

Thompson urges those planning to build a new home to consider everything from what kind of lifestyle they want to lead in their new home (is a formal dining space necessary? How often do you entertain visitors?) to whether anyone in the family plays an instrument (will you need space for a large grand piano? Is a sound-proof area a requirement?). Tell buyers to collect pictures of design elements features that appeal to them, so that they can approach designers and builders with ideas already in mind (the book even highlights some homes—with pictures!—that have desirable features).

There’s also plenty of advice throughout The New New Home for those hoping to build environmentally-conscious homes, although an index or a glossary with a breakdown of the convoluted industry standards that determine whether a house is eco-friendly or not would have been a nice touch for real estate agents, home buyers, and builders alike.

Thompson also predicts what’s coming next for sustainable housing, so if you have clients who are really ahead of the curve, you’ll be able to understand what they need. For example, he says smart metering systems that can tell you the best time of day to do a load of laundry or run the dishwasher are coming. And recent news supports his position: Just this year, Google purchased the startup Nest Labs Inc., a company that produces smart metering systems and smoke alarms.

If you work frequently with clients looking to build their own homes, or want to get a good idea of what qualifies as an eco-conscious home, keep The New New Home on hand.

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Effective Open Houses

Written by: Krysi Simon, office assistant, Julie Pogue Properties

 

Have you ever wondered whether the cost/benefit of an open house makes it worth your time and effort? Or the time and effort of your sellers?  Following a few strategic tips can help you to make the most of your open houses, both for you, as the agent, and your client, as the homeowner.

 

Tip #1: Capitalize on Your Only Chance at a First Impression

Use face-to-face time with buyers to be memorable.  Ask them questions.  Learn about their families, their likes, their dislikes. Make the time with them in the home conversational and convey your interest in meeting their home needs and desires.

 

Tip #2: Guests, not Customers

Notice that I used the term  “guests?” That’s just what visitors to an open house are and just how they should be treated.  As an alternative to treating them as “customers” that wander the house looking for you, greet them at the door.  Engage them and make them feel welcome.  Provide them with a tidbit of information that entices them to see more than the entryway.

 

Tip #3: Use Teasers

Find a centrally located area to attractively display brochures, school information, neighborhood details, etc.  These items should be in large, bold print and allow for easily processed information.  Additionally, they should not provide the buyer with every piece of information about the property but should invite them to want to know more.

 

Tip #4: Don’t be a Pest

Approach visitors in a way that allows them to see you as a resource but does not make them feel as if they are running from you.   Be aware of visitors, where they are and how long they’ve been in the home but making guests feel as if they are being “followed” will result in them rushing through the property and likely bypassing many of the home’s features.

 

Tip #5: Put the House’s Best Foot Forward

In order to make guests feel at home in the house, make it inviting, friendly and clean.  Both the interior and exterior of the home should appear welcoming and allow the buyer to envision themselves and their family in the home.  Use visual markers to point out features of the home that they may easily pass by since you will not be escorting them step-by-step.

 

Tip #6: Schedule Strategically

Open houses are most effectively utilized in areas that are easily accessible.  Also take into account neighborhood/community activities that may either bolster or hinder the number of visitors you receive.  For example, choosing to hold an open house on the weekend of a neighborhood yard sale may increase the amount of viewers while one held on the day of the Kentucky Derby will most likely not result in many guests.

 

Tip #7: Who Doesn’t Like Food & Drinks??

After a long day of house hunting, many guests will be welcomed by an offer of refreshment.  Items should be simple.  Small hor dourves and beverages that appeal to a broad range of palates will be most effective. Place these in a location that is approximately 1/3 of their way around the home and, while the refreshments should remain within view, avoid making them feel forced.  If the atmosphere of the home and community allow, a few choices of wines can also make open house visitors feel like guests in a home.  Below are a few reasonably priced, widely-palatable recommendations:

 

WHITE WINES

Chardonnay

Kendall Jackson

Bonterra

MacMurray Ranch

Edna Valley

Benziger

Frei Brothers

Laguna

 

Sauvignon Blanc

Kendall Jackson

Bonterra

Edna Valley

Benziger

Whitehaven

Frei Brothers

 

Riesling

Kendall Jackson

 

Pinot Gris

MacMurray Ranch

King Estate (Acrobat)

 

 

RED WINES

Cabernet

Louis Martini

Kendall Jackson

Frei Brothers

Benziger

Bonterra

 

Merlot

Kendall Jackson

Frei Brothers

Benziger

Bonterra

 

Zinfandel

Kendall Jackson

Frei Brothers

Bonterra

 

Pinot Noir

Kendall Jackson

Frei Brothers

MacMurray Ranch

Bonterra

 

Blend

Apothic

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August Recess Isn't Slowing Down NAR

August Recess Isn’t Slowing Down NAR

By 2014 NAR President Steve Brown

Congress has adjourned for the rest of the summer, but that isn’t stopping REALTORS® from staying in touch with our representatives. NAR’s hardworking Federal Political Coordinators are meeting with Congress in their home districts.

The meetings are focused on two legislative priorities vital to NAR members and consumers – reinstating mortgage debt cancellation and reauthorizing terrorism risk insurance for businesses. NAR President Steve Brown provides the latest on both of these issues in the video below.

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